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Adrian Rea Literacy Center, Community Reach out to People of Flint

April 29, 2016, Flint, Michigan – A Goodwill van that left Adrian, Michigan for Flint on April 22 carried with it much more than generous supplies of tuna, salmon, diapers, and baby wipes. The van carried with it the heart-felt desires of members of the Adrian community to make a difference in the lives of people who still hurting from the disastrous contamination of lead in their water.

The collection brought in 577 cans of tuna, 179 cans of salmon, 82 packages of diapers, 19 cases of diapers, and 217 packages of baby wipes.

Posing in Flint with the donations are, from left: Dan Buron, Executive Director of Goodwill Industries; Sisters Sarah Cavanaugh and Carleen Maly, of Adrian Rea Literacy Center; two volunteers from Flint; and Sister Carol Weber, Director of St. Luke’s N.E.W. Life Center.

Sister Carleen Maly, OP, Director of Adrian Rea Literacy Center on the Motherhouse Campus, spearheaded the collection among the Sisters and those involved in the literacy center. Also participating in the collection were members of St. John Lutheran Church in Adrian, whose pastor, Joel Sarrault, is a former board member of Adrian Rea; parishioners of St. Joseph Catholic Church in Adrian, at the request of Associate Katie Love, of the Congregation’s Spiritual Life Office; and Goodwill Industries in Adrian. Dan Buron, executive director of Goodwill, drove the van. Members of the Adrian Rea staff also traveled to Flint to make the donation.

“We have felt so helpless,” Sister Carleen explained. “We didn’t know what to do to help.”

But instructions on how to help came through a letter by Sister Carol Weber, OP, co-founder and co-director of St. Luke’s N.E.W. Life Center in Flint to Sister Carol Jean Kesterke, OP, her Chapter Prioress, and to members of the Chapter’s Mission Council.  

N.E.W. (North End Women) Life was established in 2002 to “support at-risk families in the North End of Flint,” Sister Carol explained. Services have included nutrition education, life skills classes, employment skills training, a sewing co-op that has enabled the women of Flint to earn a decent living through their sewing skills, and, in 2008, a literacy center. 

“In response to the water crisis in Flint, the center has become a distribution center for bottled water,” Sister Carol wrote. She has also requested donations of tuna, salmon, juice, milk, diapers, and baby wipes. N.E.W. Life has begun offering a nutrition and support group for pregnant women and the mothers of small children, teaching them how to serve nutritious meals to counteract the effects of the lead in their children. 

“We are focused on being proactive in combatting the fallout from this human disaster,” Sister Carol wrote. And so many people, touched by the situation, are willing to stand with their sisters and brothers in Flint.

Adrian Rea and N.E.W. Life Literacy Center are two of seven literacy centers sponsored by the Adrian Dominican Sisters, under the umbrella of the Dominican Rea Literacy Corporation. Other sponsored literacy centers are Aquinas, Chicago; DePorres Place, West Palm Beach, Florida; and Dominican, Siena, and All Saints, all in Detroit.

 

Feature photo: Pictured in Adrian with the donations for N.E.W. Life Center are staff members of Adrian Rea Literacy Center, from left: Sister Joan Mary, Brenda Sparkman, Sister Sarah Cavanaugh, Sister Joanne McCauley, Sister Carleen Maly, and Sister Kathleen Clausen.


Adrian Dominicans Open Doors to Neighbors During National Catholic Sisters Week

March 14, 2016, Adrian, Michigan – The Adrian Dominican Sisters opened their doors to Lenawee County community members, donors, Co-workers and their families, staff members of Siena Heights University, and other interested guests March 9. An Evening with the Adrian Dominican Sisters, a special event for National Catholic Sisters Week, gave Sisters, Associates, Co-workers and guests a unique opportunity to get to know one another. 

Sister Attracta Kelly, OP, Prioress of the Congregation, welcomes open house guests.

In her opening address early in the evening, Sister Attracta Kelly, OP, Prioress of the Congregation, presented a brief history and background of the Adrian Dominican Congregation. She also emphasized the special relationship the Congregation has to their local neighbors. 

“While we as Adrian Dominican Sisters value relationships and collaboration with people across the globe, since 1884 we have known and been part of Lenawee County,” Sister Attracta noted. “We are proud to call Lenawee County and the City of Adrian home.” In turn, she invited her guests to feel at home on the campus of the Congregation’s Motherhouse. “You are welcome to join us at any time,” she said. Our doors are open. We have no gates, so feel free please to come and join us at any time.”

Adrian Mayor Jim Berryman presented a proclamation for National Catholic Sisters Week, reiterating the strong relationship between the Adrian Dominican Sisters and their home town, Adrian, Michigan. “Adrian and the Dominican Sisters have a 137-year history together,” Mayor Berryman noted. “The City of Adrian is a stronger community because of the Dominican Sisters.”

Sara Bingham, left, of WLEN Radio, interviews Sister Carleen Maly, OP, Director of the Adrian Rea Literacy Center.

Before the two-hour event began, Sara Bingham, of WLEN Radio, offered a remote broadcast from the Adrian Room of Madden Hall, where the refreshments and information tables were set up. She invited community members to attend the open house and conducted brief interviews with a number of representatives of Adrian Dominican programs: Sister Lorraine Réaume, OP, Formation Director; Sister Maria Goretti Browne, OP, on the Sisters; Associate Arlene Bachanov on the Congregation’s history; Erin Dress, Human Resources Director, on employment opportunities; Sister Peg O’Flynn, OP, on Weber Center; Sister Carleen Maly, OP, on the Adrian Rea Literacy Center; Jennifer Hunter and Ashley LaVigne on the campus; Sister Carol Coston, OP, on permaculture; and Amy Palmer on development.

Guests stroll through the first-floor corridor of Madden Hall during a guided tour of the Motherhouse.

Throughout the evening, guests were invited to meet the Sisters and learn about their lives, browse the various information tables, take part in a guided tour of the Motherhouse, and enjoy refreshments and companionship with others.

An Evening with the Adrian Dominican Sisters was funded by a grant from National Catholic Sisters Week to enable local community members to come to know the Congregation and the presence of the Adrian Dominican Sisters and Associates among them. Held March 8-14 every year, the week gives people throughout the United States the opportunity to become more aware of Catholic Sisters and the role they play in Church and in society.

Read a related article by Lonnie Huhman in the Daily Telegram.


 

 

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