A Sister Reflects


With great joy we celebrated the Rite of First Profession of Marilín Llanes this past Sunday! During our vow ceremonies, the Sister always makes a “statement of intent,” putting her commitment in her own words. This statement reflects what Marilín has discerned in order to walk forward on this path of vowed life:

Intent Statement for Temporary Vows – April 10, 2016

It is my intent with all my heart and soul to enter into a deeper commitment with my loving God, and my dear Adrian Dominican Sisters.

I pray that I may be open to God’s grace and invite the Spirit to create in me a clear, open, strong, full and joy-filled heart. 

I want to preach the living Word of God Creator with a persistent, insistent, and consistent voice that challenges systems that oppress, repress, and depress all of our natural life, and to be present in solidarity with the poor and suffering of people on the margins. 

Blessed am I to be called and to have found the way back home to my beloved Adrian Dominican Sisters. 


“My yes to God is always, now, and forever.” These are the words of our Sister Alma who just made final vows on April 3. I just returned from the Philippines where I was able to be present with our 38 sisters there and celebrate the final vows of both Sisters Alma and Salvacion.

These are two women who have recently been through a very intense discernment and came to be sure they wanted to give their whole lives. They said the formation years haven’t always been easy, and there are certainly ups and downs, but they both knew this was the right step. I could see their excitement as the ceremony approached and was witness to their deep joy that day. 

As we chatted the night before the ceremony, they could both articulate clearly what the vows mean to them. Alma speaks of her commitment as a covenant with God and as a commitment to serve God and the people of God with joy.” Salvacion sees her vows as “a manifestation of God’s mercy and compassion.” They are her way "to love and serve selflessly now and forever." Both sisters live lives of direct service, deep prayer, and community. 

How would you describe your “yes” to God?

Blessings of the Easter Season,

Sister Lorraine



This week we feature guest blogger, Sister Ann Romayne Fallon, OP, Holy Rosary Chapter Assistant.

It will soon be 70 years since I said “Yes” to God and responded to his call to life as an Adrian Dominican Sister.  Actually, I was blessed with an early awareness of where this journey might take me and why I gave it much consideration, especially during my secondary school years.  Looking back, I know this call was initiated by these remarkable women who nurtured my desire to learn and an even greater desire to become a teacher.  My love for school was strong and kept the dream alive.

Ultimately, it was the wonderful spirit of these sisters that opened the door for me and encouraged the process of discernment toward this exciting and life-changing possibility.  I found myself mentally exploring what it would be like to be sent to unknown places whenever and wherever needed and, of course, not fully realizing the great challenges that would be required in order to serve God’s people in the footsteps of Dominic.  But nothing daunts those who are ready to take on the world!

With the support of faith-filled parents who swallowed their fears and allowed their oldest/recent high school graduate the freedom to follow her heart.  As a result I have made a commitment to this incredible mystery that calls the heart to discipleship and the discovery of the difference between the “wisdom of the world” and the “wisdom of God.”  And I have never looked back!  

Religious life has granted me countless blessings and provided many opportunities to deepen my spiritual life, to live and enjoy the gift of community, and to be granted ministerial assignments that touched the lives of thousands of young people and helped them to recognize their mission to make our world a better place for others.  A challenge that continues to be mine as well.


"Celtic Cross" by Smabs Sputzer via Flickr creative commons

There is a beautiful prayer called the “Breastplate of St. Patrick.” In honor of his feast day, I invite you to listen to a beautifully sung version of it here.

The lyrics are below. Take some time to let the words wash over you. Picture the images. When you get to the part about Christ, you might even try movement to match the words. That is a way of praying with your body.

After you have prayed, ponder by what power you arise. “I arise today through…”

I arise today through the strength of heaven
Light of sun, radiance of moon
Splendor of fire, speed of lightning
Swiftness of wind, depth of the sea
Stability of earth, firmness of rock

I arise today through God's strength to pilot me
God's eye to look before me
God's wisdom to guide me
God's way to lie before me
God's shield to protect me

From all who shall wish me ill
Afar and a-near
Alone and in a multitude
Against every cruel, merciless power
That may oppose my body and soul

Christ with me, Christ before me
Christ behind me, Christ in me
Christ beneath me, Christ above me
Christ on my right, Christ on my left
Christ when I lie down, Christ when I sit down
Christ when I arise, Christ to shield me

Christ in the heart of everyone who thinks of me
Christ in the mouth of everyone who speaks of me

I arise today

Blessings,
Sister Lorraine


“I didn’t realize it was so beautiful here!” “Wow – you have so much going on; I had no idea!” Those were just a couple of the comments we heard last night as we held “An Evening with the Adrian Dominican Sisters,” and invited the local community to spend time with us, tour the motherhouse, and visit displays of the many activities in which we are involved. It was a great event.

Even in our small city, where we have had sisters since 1884, there are people who don’t know much about us. As human beings we need to connect, to meet face to face at times, to really encounter each other in the flesh, in order to really meet each other. We just get a better sense of people and their reality when we show up. That’s why Jesus said to his first followers, “Come and see.” He could have only talked and talked to them, but it was in journeying with him that they truly came to know him and his mission.

If you have a sense that you may be called to religious life, after you have done the e-mails and the calls and it still seems to draw you, but you are not sure, the next step is to “come and see.” Almost all communities of sisters, brothers and priests have this option. The next Adrian Dominican Sisters’ “Come and See” is April 15-17. Click here for more information.

What is God inviting you to “come and see” in your life?


Would you like to attend a nine day meeting with 200 people during which you have to discuss, come to agreement, and make decisions that affect your life for the next six years and beyond? Not only that, you want to do it in a spirit of prayer and with a desire to follow God’s will. On top of it, the people you are with aren’t simply colleagues, but the very people you have committed to share you life with. 

We just did it. We just had a General Chapter, which is pretty much what I describe above. And we are still here, possibly more united, having taken time for silence, for prayer, for deep listening, for heartfelt discussion, for putting the common good ahead of our individual agendas, and for fun and laughter. That’s how you discern God’s will with 200 people. You have to invest yourself and let go at the same time. You have to listen for the voice of God in your sister, in small groups, in large groups, and in the words of prayer and scripture. You have to care deeply and let go in freedom. 

A gathering like this is an act of trust in God and in your sisters.

Have you lived an experience of this type of large group discernment and trust? 



Sometimes we think we’ve figured out a future direction, that we’ve discerned something, but than the other people involved don’t come to the same conclusion. It’s rather unsettling and can be very confusing. You can decide that you want to spend the rest of your life with someone, but if they decide they don’t want to be with you, you obviously can’t force a relationship! This is true for a friendship, a job, and even a religious congregation. Discernment is a two way process – we do all we can to be faithful to God’s desire for our life, and then we hold it lightly. We need to leave God, the other person, and even ourselves free. 

"The Power of Prayer" by Robert V via Flickr creative commons

We are coming up to a General Chapter, a meeting held every six years in which we make decisions about our future direction and elect new leaders. We have been actively engaged in discerning for almost two years. No doubt many of us sisters will arrive with a strong sense of where we need to go in the future. And no doubt these ideas will not all be the same. We now will be called to discern together, to hold lightly the ideas that we bring and to hear the voice of God in the other. 

Discernment is always bigger than “me and God.” What are the other voices you need to attend to in your own discernment?

Blessings, 

Sister Lorraine


At dinner the other night, one of the Sisters said, “My spiritual director asked me, ‘So what does Lent mean to you?’ So now I want to ask each of you.” We each shared our thoughts.  It was a good discussion and here are some of the meanings we had: 

"Waiting for the Word" by Christian Cross 37 via Flickr creative commons

- It’s like a second chance, a deeper commitment than what I did for Advent.

- A time to slow down and get closer to God, to take time to listen to God.

- A time to take on new practices so I grow in my faith and as a person.

- A time to be more aware of others.

- I try to ask God how God wants me to pray in a new way, what God wants me to give up, and what God wants me to give.

We reflected that sometimes these Lenten practices are for a time of six weeks and other times doing them can lead us into a new life pattern. All of us had the desire to grow, to become more who God made us to be.

What does Lent mean for you? What is God saying to you these Lenten days? Jesus prepared for his public ministry by spending forty days in the desert listening to God and being very aware of all the inner and outer temptations facing him. He grew strong and came out ready to take on a new way of being. What do you need to do to prepare for what God is calling you to do and be?

Blessings, 

Sister Lorraine



"My first attempt at rain drops" by Ben Angel via Flicker creative commons.
Do you ever enter really important times with some apprehension? Maybe it's a job interview, a heavy conversation you need to have with a friend, or an important family get together. You want everything to go well. You hope there won't be painful conflict. You hope something good that you might not have even imagined can come to pass. But first you have to show up. 

We have a General Chapter coming up in a few short weeks. That's a very large meeting held every six years during which we make decisions for the future and elect new leadership. We've been planning and talking for quite a while, but we are also praying for the Spirit to guide us. 

When you "show up" for something really important, and you are a person of faith, or a group based on your faith, you know it's bigger than you and all your plans. Certainly, God is a part of all the preparation and reflecting, but you also know that the Spirit can enter and produce an outcome that you never even dreamed of. God asks us both to prepare and to hold everything lightly. 

Is God asking you to hold something more lightly so that God can surprise you? Are you willing to take the risk?

Blessings, 
Sister Lorraine

This week's reflection comes to us from Marilin Llanes. Marilin is a Bilingual School Psychologist in Chicago, and is currently a candidate for readmission.

The Welcome

The doorbell rang at my family home, and I opened the door.  Behind me comes my mother shouting over my shoulder to this stranger (at least in my eyes), “Adelante! Estás en tu casa!” – a greeting similar to “come on in and make yourself at home.” There was an air of warmth and joy in the room as we greeted each other with the customary hug and cheek kiss. I was reminded of the passage from Matthew 25:35, “I was a stranger and you welcomed me.”

The Invitation

It’s the middle of the day I’m sitting quietly at Cor Gesu Chapel in my freshman year at Barry University, when I hear a voice from the pew behind me. I turned around and there was Sr. Alice Joseph, fondly known as A.J.  She asked me something like, “Have you given any thought to becoming an Adrian Dominican Sister?” Our eyes met, and I was speechless not knowing what to say to her. Then from somewhere in me I told her that I frankly had not given much thought to religious life (at the time I was in a serious relationship), but out of respect for her I would think about it. This invitation changed and transformed the course of the rest of my life.  The words of St. Catherine of Siena from “The Letters” best summarizes it, “… no matter what happens, we know that everything is done with God’s providence and tremendous love.” A belated thank you to Sister A.J.

The gift of welcome and the wisdom of invitation are transformative movements in my faith journey. Now, I want to practice them with you. Welcome/Bienvenida… Come And See Adrians (C.A.S.A). Peace be with you. 



Get out your bell-bottoms and platform shoes, because DISCO is here!

Okay, so it's a little less dancing, a little more talking... Sisters Lorraine Réaume, OP, and Sara Fairbanks, OP, have a new video series called DISCO (Discernment Conversations): Dancing with the questions of life!

 


Sister Lorraine Réaume, OP
Director of Formation

Sister Sara Fairbanks, OP
Director of Vocations, East Coast-Midwest Vocations Promoter


Adrian Dominican Sisters
1257 East Siena Heights Drive
Adrian, Michigan 49221-1793
517-266-3537

 


 

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