In Memoriam


(1928-2019)

One of the many young women to enter the Congregation with the “Ambrosian Spirit” – educated by the Adrian Dominicans at St. Ambrose School in Grosse Pointe Park, Michigan, just outside the Detroit city limits – was Marcelline Fouchey.

Marcelline was born on September 30, 1928, in Detroit to Harvey and Laurette (Bernier) Fouchey. Both Harvey and Laurette were of French stock dating back some five hundred years. Their respective sets of parents both were from Quebec, Canada; Harvey was born in Detroit but Laurette’s birthplace was Bromptonville, (today part of the city of Sherbrooke), Quebec. She came to Detroit at the age of twenty and married Harvey the next year, in 1927.

The couple had five children in all. Sister Marcelline was the oldest of the children; her two sisters were Florence, sixteen months younger, and Annette, four years younger. Two boys died in infancy. Florence would actually follow her big sister, with whom she was very close, into the Congregation, becoming Sister Mary Marcelle, but left in 1970 after twenty-three years in the community.

Read more about Sister Marcelline (pdf)

make a memorial giftMemorial gifts may be made to Adrian Dominican Sisters, 1257 East Siena Heights Drive, Adrian, Michigan, 49221. 


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(1936-2019)

Marie worked hard, often behind the scenes, with no need for thanks or praise. She trusted the call to serve, however it came, and responded generously.

Sister Carol Johannes spoke these words about Sister Marie Quenneville in her homily at Sister Marie’s funeral Mass, further describing Sister Marie as a humble woman, a splendid and creative teacher, and a wonderful witness to the Dominican dedication to truth.

Sister Marie was born January 18, 1936, in Detroit, to George and Marie (Bonten) Quenneville. George was born in Stoney Pointe, Ontario, Canada, where his family had a farm, and met his future wife while he was what was called a “nickel immigrant,” commuting on the Windsor to Detroit ferry – which cost a nickel to ride – to work at the National Biscuit Company (Nabisco) factory in Detroit.

Marie Bonten had come to Detroit with her mother, Clara, and two siblings from Antwerp, Belgium, in 1921. Her father, Charles, had arrived at some earlier point to get a job and establish a home, and Clara and her children followed. Not knowing a word of English, they sailed for the United States, went through Ellis Island, and boarded a train for Detroit, where Charles met his family at the Michigan Central train station.

Read more about Sister Marie (pdf)

make a memorial giftMemorial gifts may be made to Adrian Dominican Sisters, 1257 East Siena Heights Drive, Adrian, Michigan, 49221. 

 

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(1926-2019)

A music lover, a reader, a puzzle-doer, someone who worked at living simply, and a woman who was faithful to prayer: this was how Sister Jane Irene Hutton was described after her death by Sister Rosemary Asaro, Holy Rosary Chapter Assistant, at Sister Jane Irene’s wake service.

Sister Jane Irene was born Irene Jane Hutton on October 31, 1926, in Chicago to William and Irene (Beck) Hutton. Bill, as he was called, was a Chicago native who worked as a certified public accountant, first for the Chicago World’s Fair and then for the largest bank in the city at the time, the Northern Trust Company.

“I remember how hard he worked and provided for the family. … He would work as a cashier during the day and audit the books after the bank closed,” Sister Jane Irene said in her life story. “He would get home very late each night but I can still see my mother sitting near the window looking for him to be coming up the street so she could have a hot meal ready when he walked in the door.”

Irene, for her part, was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri, of French parents who had come to the United States before World War I. She worked as a nurse in a doctor’s office when she first came to Chicago, before she married Bill. “She was a gentle person and a wonderful cook,” Sister Jane Irene said of her mother. “All our meals were great family affairs.”

Read more about Sister Jane Irene (pdf)

make a memorial giftMemorial gifts may be made to Adrian Dominican Sisters, 1257 East Siena Heights Drive, Adrian, Michigan, 49221.

 

Leave your comments and remembrances (if you don't see the comment box below, click on the "Read More" link).


(1929-2019)

When Sister Jeanne O’Laughlin transitioned away from the Presidency of Barry University in 1994, she was honored at a celebratory luncheon as “a durable woman who went ahead of us leading the way often through uncharted waters.”

Several memories of Sister Jeanne’s tenure at Barry are found in those luncheon remarks. Found there is a mention of the creative ways in which she got donors to contribute toward a capital project on Barry’s “west forty” acreage – singing a song, accepting a bet regarding learning to ballroom dance – and an accounting of all the people she had helped to get a Barry education, ranging from countless underprivileged students to hundreds of refugees.

In all, Sister Jeanne O’Laughlin spent twenty-three years as Barry’s president. That ministry was part of a long life of service to the field of education as well as to the Congregation itself.

Sister Jeanne was born on May 4, 1929, in Detroit to Thomas Anthony and Mary Margaret (Croak) O’Laughlin. She had very few memories of her mother, who died of complications from childbirth not long after Sister Jeanne turned six years old. Sister Jeanne wrote in her autobiography that she remembered her father taking the children to the hospital and having them stand outside watching the window of the room where her mother was. “I recall the picture vividly of a man holding a woman in his arms as she waved at us,” she wrote. “That was the end of my life with my mother.”

Read more about Sister Jeanne (pdf)

make a memorial giftMemorial gifts may be made to Adrian Dominican Sisters, 1257 East Siena Heights Drive, Adrian, Michigan, 49221. 

Click here to read the extensive news coverage on Sister Jeanne's death.


 


Cemetery of the Adrian Dominican Sisters

Our Adrian Dominican cemetery with its circular headstones is a beautiful place of rest for women who gave their lives in service to God — and a peaceful place for contemplation and remembrance. 


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